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August 02, 2008

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Hi John (Jack):

Enjoyed reading many posts on your blog. Checked out your bio and wholeheartedly agree with your statement "More recently I've come to realize that Michigan's key contributions to saving the Nation are not appropriately recognized or appreciated. This blog is part of an effort to rectify this error." I too personally am working on a project that will rectify this in southeast MI.

Publicly, I'm working to help promote the legacy of Civil War hero General George Armstrong Custer and his Monroe, Michigan connections. Check out our blog and please pump up the famed 7th Cavalry. The Monroe County Historical Museum has on loan for a limited time an interesting exhibit called Trevilian Station. The collection contains Custer’s personal effects that were captured on June 11, 1964 by Confederates at Trevilian Station, Virginia. These items were taken home by a Confederate soldier, stashed under the bed, and lost for 135 years. Many other great exhibits as well.

Please check out our blog and pump up Custer and Monroe Michigan's contributions to the Civil War. Let's work together to promote the great history of this state.

blogsmonroe.com/custer/

And join us for the Custer Celebration Event scheduled for Oct 3 - 11. Although this year's focus is his western years, Civil War buffs will find the event interesting as well.

Karin

Catton discovered that, while a civil war, of all wars, is the most probable to engender “irreconcilably wild feelings” and “incurable hatred,” that did not find in the United States.
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Nimmijones

http://www.treatmentcenters.org/michigan

Very intersting, thanks for the insight.

I read Catton in high school. And if you want to read about the battles, the flow of the war, read him today.

But if you want the big picture, he does not supply it. I feel now rather cheated, frankly.

Not by Catton, but by the poltically correct nonsense we have learned that nearly absolves the South of any possible guilt. As if nothing can be said that might dissatisfy any Southern apologist.

I had to get away from the text books, away from the Catton and Freemans and Footes.

Thank God for Google books. They digitized 10 billion (or whatever) pages of books, newspapers, and pamphlets, no doubt saving many from impending dust.

I learned an entirely different view from the South's own works -- their own books from 1840-1860. Their own newspapers. Their own documents.

Things like the Five Ultimatums, issued by the South at literally the same moment the seceded. Does Catton mention these ultimatums? No, I don't remember them anyway.

These were central, these were the summation of Southern demands, FROM the Southern leaders AT exactly the start of the Civil War.

All of the ultimatums were about the spread of slavery. The South was threatening the North, that if the North did not allow the SPREAD of slavery --by violence --- then the South would attack.

How on earth do you miss that?

How do you not report what the Southern newspapers cheered, and what Southern leaders announced loudly and proudly?
'
The Southern newspapers called the Ultimatums "THE TRUE ISSUE".

SHow me where Freeman, or Foote, or Catton, or anyone, even mentioned those.

Show me a single text book EVER printed in the US, which listed the Five Ultimatums.

Were these unkown things? No, they were boasted about, reported North and South, and cheered in the South.

If Catton mentioned such things, he did not draw attention to it. These Ultimatums were so extreme, so outlandish, but so revealing, it should have been the TITLE for at least a dozen history books.

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